How India and Pakistan divided classical music

How India and Pakistan divided classical music http://theindianeconomist.com/how-india-and-pakistan-divided-classical-music/ : By Laksmi Subramanian At the end of September 2016, the Indian motion picture producerโ€™s association, Indiaโ€™s largest organisation related to entertainment, announced a ban on all Pakistani artists. In retaliation, Pakistan authorities imposed a complete ban on airing Indian content on all its TV channels, including Bollywood movies. This cultural war, triggered by the September Uri attacks in Kashmir, is far from new. Indeed it is a sad reminder of last year, when the Indian ultra regionalist Maharashtrian-based party Shiv Sena threatened to disrupt a performance by celebrity singer Ghulam Ali in Mumbai, forcing the concert to be canceled. What are … Continue reading How India and Pakistan divided classical music

The Dodd-Frank Act doesnโ€™t solve the principal-agent problem in asset securitization

[Repost] The Dodd-Frank Act doesnโ€™t solve the principal-agent problem in asset securitization http://theindianeconomist.com/the-dodd-frank-act-doesnt-solve-the-principal-agent-problem-in-asset-securitisation/ By Shanuka Senarath The concept of asset securitization dates back to the Roman Empire. The practice of Pignus and Hypothec enabled a Roman citizen to secure his or her long-term debts with the land. By the 11th and 12th centuries in medieval Europe, mortgages were used to finance crusades. Modern-day securitization marks its beginning in Copenhagen, in the 1800โ€™s, when the British set fire to the city. Proceeds from securitized assets were used to rebuild the doomed town. In simple terms, securitization is all about selling someoneโ€™s … Continue reading The Dodd-Frank Act doesnโ€™t solve the principal-agent problem in asset securitization

Why reducing inequality could be a matter of survival (repost)

Why reducing inequality could be a matter of survival http://theindianeconomist.com/why-reducing-inequality-a-matter-of-survival/ By Kaushik Basu Global inequality today is at a level last seen in the late nineteenth century โ€“ and it is continuing to rise. With it has come a surging sense of disenfranchisement that has fueled alienation and anger, and even bred nationalism and xenophobia. As people struggle to hold on to their shrinking share of the pie, their anxiety has created a political opening for opportunistic populists, shaking the world order in the process. The gap between rich and poor nowadays is mind-boggling. Oxfam has observed that the worldโ€™s eight richest people … Continue reading Why reducing inequality could be a matter of survival (repost)

Germany is the best countries to be an entrepreneur (repost)ย 

The best countries to be an entrepreneur http://theindianeconomist.com/the-best-countries-to-be-an-entrepreneur/ By Thomas Colson A central European country tops a global ranking of the best places to be an entrepreneur โ€” although several continents are represented at the top of the list. The index, compiled by Wharton University and market research firm Y&R, evaluates a total of 80 countries which collectively account for 95% of the global Gross Domestic Product. The overall ranking considers a wide range of factors to create an overall โ€œbest countriesโ€ index, including entrepreneurship, heritage, quality of life, and openness for business. Business Insider took a look at the … Continue reading Germany is the best countries to be an entrepreneur (repost)ย